Rory Duckhouse

Rory Duckhouse

My work looks at ideas of information and control, my mixed media practice works across image and text to look at how our behaviour can be influenced by external factors. Trained as a photographer, I am concerned with our relationship to photography and ways of seeing. Taking the photograph as a piece of information, I attempt to look at how a layering of time has an effect on the veracity of the image. Photography is a powerful medium, both personally and in the media but is very much a subjective art form. We create more images now than ever before, but what is the legacy of these images and how could this information be misused? Using this as a platform, my work explores the space between photography, history, information, control and technology, amongst many other ideas.

Latest Posts

01.11.2017 / Notes from Venice #4  →

Notes on visiting the Arsenale and Giardini 

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27.10.2017 / Notes from Venice #3  →

A few thoughts on living in Venice for a short period, being somewhere between a Venetian and a tourist.  

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22.10.2017 / Notes from Venice #2  →

A few thoughts on living in Venice for a short period, being somewhere between a Venetian and a tourist. 

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19.10.2017 / Notes from Venice #1  →

A few thoughts on living in Venice for a short period, being somewhere between a Venetian and a tourist. 

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Project

During the Biennale I would like to look at how people navigate the space, observing behaviours and ways of moving, these will then be made into a series of text works. I will observe how people deal with the space, how they react to signage and use maps. I will then create a series of my own maps and possibly hand them out for people to use.

The original Situationist dérive was in Venice and I would like to try and recreate it using only the images left behind. Completed in 1957 Ralph Rumney drifted through the city streets of Venice leaving behind a series of images in the style of popular magazines of the time. The dérive was a kind of aimless wandering through the city streets, Guy Debord defines the dérive as "a mode of experimental behaviour linked to the conditions of urban society: a technique of rapid passage through varied ambiances.” Using Rumney's images as a guide I would try to follow his footsteps as a way to look at the veracity of his images and the information contained in them. This would manifest in text, sound and video.